Diamond Plate Half Doors

Warrior Products Logo
Bolt Depot
Kentrol LogoHarley-Davidson3M
BestopMoParSmittybuilt
 

Mirrors and Doors Installed - Click to Enlarge

5/26/06

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

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These are the doors we installed on the 1999 Wrangler (picture may not match the product color)

(More doors and other parts below)

New Doors

Most times I have gone out on trips with my full doors.  Quite often the internal struggle whether to bring them or not would go something like this:

"It's not supposed to rain."

"Yeah, but what if it does - it's two hours on the road and it will really stink if it's raining and the doors are leaning against the wall in the garage and not on the Jeep!"

Or I would go out for an overnight trip and decide to remove the doors, but be forced to leave them in camp.  This wasn't nearly as problematic (though it did sometimes result in later wishing I had them along) but I always had the nagging fear they'd be gone when I returned.  Anyone who's priced full steel doors from Jeep lately knows that the insurance company would not be very happy to hear from me, and I would not be very happy with either the cost of replacing them myself or paying the surcharge on the insurance.

So most of the time I just left the doors on, sometimes happy I did when the weather turned, but often wishing I had half doors that I could stow on board and use them only when needed.

I looked at two options to solve this problem and had decided that soft upper and lower doors would work.  But when I got my new sailcloth top, it came with new door uppers.  That was nice except that I didn't have the lowers and these would only fit on the hard lower halves. 

Pricing just the lower soft doors, I found they were not made to accept uppers.  It's a great example of bad engineering, or good marketing - making the uppers so that are dedicated to just one solution and not both, but such as it was, I decided to scare up some upper door frames, mount the new upper skins and stow them away for the day when I got some lower half doors to use them with.  The door frames were cheap so it was not a big investment.

I found some steel half-doors online and had made arrangements to get them but the deal fell through.  I watched regular steel half doors sell all day long on eBay for $600 or more.  I even refinished a set for my friend Carl.  By the time I got through all this suffering, I pretty much decided there was nothing I could do but sell the uppers and buy what I needed.

Then I found the perfect solution.  Warrior Products makes a half door that is compatible with my soft uppers.  So after staring at them in the catalog all winter long, I finally bought them.

I chose to get the black ones and the brackets required to install the uppers.  But that's just the beginning...

Warrior Products Logo

Warrior Products Door

Warrior Products Diamond Plate Half Doors in Black for 97-06 Jeep Wrangler TJ
(Quadratec Part No: 11140.02 326.04)

Warrior Products Door Upper Brackets

These are the doors we installed on the 1999 Wrangler (picture may not match the product color)

 

 

Warrior Products Window Brackets for Diamond Plate Doors for 97-06 Jeep Wrangler TJ
(Quadratec Part No: 11140.900 51.84)

They came very quickly and I got busy deciding what I was going to do with them.  They are cut from diamond plate aluminum and are powder coat black.

Door before assembly - Click to Enlarge

Inside of Door before Assembly - Click to Enlarge

They are quite minimalist. The thinking is this - the full doors I have are large, heavy and cannot be removed on an outing unless they are left behind somewhere and retrieved later. This presents two problems. First, storage in a secure location to prevent damage and theft, and second I take a calculated risk if I leave home without them and encounter cold or wet weather and need them.  Overall I am pleased with them though in their minimal state I needed to engineer and install several items to make them useful:

Latches

Latch - Click to Enlarge
Latch in open positionBackside of Latch

The doors come complete with latches.  They're not very impressive in terms of their life expectancy but they'll have to do until I can find something better.  I would recommend treating them well if you want them to last.

I installed them on their respective doors using the provided hardware.  More about hardware in a little bit...

Latch installed on Right Door - Click to EnlargeClose-up of Latch - Click to Enlarge

The latch has an angle to the catch that conforms to the shape of the door opening.

View of inside of door with latch and weather stripping - Click to EnlargeTest-fitting the latch on door - Click to Enlarge

The instructions are very vague but it appears from the way the door panels fit on the Jeep and the contour of the panels that the latches are meant to be installed with the plate outside the door panel.  That is how they're shown in the factory photos.  But with the added thickness of the weatherstripping I used, I installed them on the inside of the door panel.

Door Latch in place - Click to EnlargeLatch installed in door - Click to Enlarge

Installing the latches is pretty straightforward.  The holes are drilled in the door panels and aside from specific parts for left and right (they're labeled in case you can't tell), there's not much to tell.

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

These are the doors we installed on the 1999 Wrangler (picture may not match the product color)

 

 

Soft Upper Door Panels

Bestop

Bestop Soft Upper Door Panel - Click to Enlarge

The new doors are designed to take an upper soft panel with plastic window, and break down into two pieces each. These are small enough to stow on board and thereby provide a way to bring them along collapsed or in place and remove or install them as needed without retrieval from remote storage.

I got the hard bottoms rather than the fabric because I already had the soft uppers (that came with my soft top) and this was the only combination that would work given what I had on hand.  I pulled out my brand new soft uppers that I had assembled two years ago and was done with this step, except for mounting the brackets that hold them!

Soft Upper Mounting Brackets

 

 

These are the doors we installed on the 1999 Wrangler (picture may not match the product color)

 

 

These were sold separately.  These provide the necessary hardware to hold the upper doors in place.

Mine came inside a separate box with no instructions of any kind.  The doors are not marked or drilled (no surprise since some folks won't order these brackets and would not want holes or marks).  This leaves those of us who do want upper door brackets to locate and install the brackets, with some holes to drill.

First, I put the doors on the Jeep and held the upper doors in place to see what took shape.  I compared the images in the catalog that shows the brackets installed to see if it matched what I was seeing. 

Warrior Products Door Upper Brackets

It did, and it helped me to orient the brackets properly.  There are six different brackets - three for each side, and they only work in one position.  So it took a few minutes to sort that out.  I believe the instructions would have provided some insight here.

Aligning Door Upper Bracket (right front) - Click to Enlarge Aligning Door Upper Bracket (right middle) - Click to Enlarge Aligning Door Upper Bracket (right rear) - Click to Enlarge
Bracket 1
Right Front
Bracket 1/2
Right Middle
Largest Bracket
Right Rear

I aligned the upper door panel so that the edges of the panel (side to side) matched the door panel.  I pressed the rubber seal on the bottom edge of the upper door down hard up against the upper part of the lower door. With the brackets placed as shown on the support pins on the upper door, I got the brackets aligned.

When I felt sure the brackets were in the right positions (I checked both doors to make sure I was not using the wrong brackets), I used a paint pen to mark the exact spot that I would drill out.

Marking for drilling with paint pen - Click to Enlarge
Paint Pen

It is important to check these marks after each bracket is laid out to be sure that the upper door has not moved and the other brackets still match their markings.

Next, I used a center punch to place a dimple in the center of each mark to help keep the drill bit from sliding around and missing the mark.

Marking for drilling with center punch - Click to Enlarge
Center Punch

The value of this step cannot be overstated.  It is much easier to drill in the right spot if the drill bit does not move around.  One of the holes centers on the very edge of the door latch. 

Marks - Note difficult centerpoint on Latch edge - Click to EnlargeMarked for drilling - note center punch marks - Click to Enlarge
Marked for drilling

Getting that hole right without the center mark to keep the drill in place would be nearly impossible.  Go buy a center punch if you don't have one - working with metal requires it!

Be sure you have the exact-sized drill bit to make a hole that perfectly fits the brackets.  This will assure that the brackets cannot move laterally and with the fastener tightened properly will not move away from the door panel.  With the amount of pressure that is put on the upper door panel to keep it tight against the door opening, you want to be sure you get this right so that door panel does not wobble around.

Centering the drill bit on each punch mark, drill the holes.  This image was staged to show centering the bit - be sure to drill with a wood block you don't care about behind the panel, and with the drill bit perpendicular to the door panel...  The material is very soft and will not take much to drill through.

Drilling - Click to Enlarge

Two holes done...

Drilled - Click to Enlarge

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

 

Fasteners (Nuts, Bolts and Washers)

Bolt Depot

The hardware included will work just fine, but if you want to dress up the installation like I did, consider using stainless steel button head fasteners, and acorn nuts.  I test-assembled the brackets with the provided fasteners and replaced them with the button head fasteners as soon as my order from Bolt Depot arrived.

I used Thread Locker Red to make sure the bracket fasteners would not come loose until I want them to - and using Red probably means I will be breaking the fasteners off to replace them with Button Socket Head Cap bolts (stainless steel).

Hardware and Thread Locker (Red) - Click to Enlarge

I put one extra washer under the bracket mounted next to the latch to make up the thickness of the latch under the other side of the bracket.  Each bolt got washers on the outside of the door and three on the inside of the door to allow the acorn nuts to properly tighten down.  This distributes the load of the bolts wider on the door panel and protects the passengers from getting cut on the bolts. 

Socket Button Head

The improved hardware I purchased does several things.  It makes the fasteners less prominent, less prone to rust, and more attractive.  The acorn nuts I installed inside the door covers the end of the bolts reducing the risk of injury from hitting the bolt, and is more attractive.  They also match the ones on the Sun Performance Heavy Duty Rocker Protection and the Sun Performance Lamp Protectors...

 

Part Number:  92949A540
Head Style Button
Material Type Stainless Steel
Finish Plain
Class Not Rated
Stainless Steel Type 18-8 Stainless Steel
Drive Style Hex Socket
Thread Size 1/4"-20
Length 3/4"
Hex Key Size 5/32"
Thread Style Right Handed
Thread Length Fully Threaded
Head Diameter .437"
Head Height .132"
Rockwell Hardness B85
Minimum Tensile Strength 85,000 psi
Thread Fit Class 3A
Specifications Met Not Rated

Button Socket Head Cap Screw Stainless SteelButton Socket Head Cap Screw Stainless Steel

Button Socket Head Cap Screw Stainless Steel - Click to Enlarge

Bolts supplied with Doors - Click to Enlarge Button Head Allen Bolts - Click to Enlarge
Factory Hardware - Good Replacement Hardware - Better

Acorn Nuts - Click to Enlarge

Here are the brackets bolted on (inside door panel view).

Installed Bracket (Right Front) - Click to Enlarge Installed Bracket (Right Middle) - Click to Enlarge Installed Bracket (Right Rear) - Clcik to Enlarge

Hardware Provided with Door Kits

Acorn Nuts - Click to Enlarge Acorn Nuts - Click to Enlarge Acorn Nuts and Mirror Bracket Mounting - Click to Enlarge

Stainless Steel Button Head Bolts and Acorn Nuts purchased
to replace stock hardware

 

These are the doors we installed on the 1999 Wrangler (picture may not match the product color)

 

 

Here are some pictures showing a second test fitting of the passenger door.  These were taken after a test drive to see how well they sealed and fit the opening.  The stock fasteners will still installed and I had not yet installed the mirrors.  I was even blessed with some rain to test how well they keep the wet out! 

Installed Door - Click to Enlarge
Installed DoorInstalled Door

A look at the inside of the door when mounted on the Jeep.

Installed Door Interior - Click to EnlargeInstalled Door Interior - Click to Enlarge
Installed Door Interior

Door Latch in placeDoor test-fit on Jeep

Door Upper Bracket Assembly to Door

Quantity

Part

Size

Number

12

Acorn Nuts

-20

Hillman #882034

48

Flat Washers

Bolt Depot #05323

12

Socket Button heads

-20 x

Bolt Depot #4412

12

Hex Nuts

-20

Bolt Depot #2563

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

Stock Product

At this point the stock assembly is done.  Here is what it looks like.  Admittedly the Jeep is dirty but this image shows the doors with the manufacturer-supplied hardware and prior to installing mirrors, check straps and other customizations and hardware upgrades.

Installed Door

 

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

Weather Stripping

3M

The 1/8" x 1/16" material they included is laughable. I'm not sure what kind of weather it's supposed to keep out, but it was not satisfactory to me. I purchased some OEM material that will provide damping and weather sealing properties - $40 added to the cost of the doors.  But the difference it makes is huge.

3M Part Number 08650NA EPDM Rubber Weatherstrip 7/8 thick by 3/4 inch wide x 8 feet long

Weatherstripping Installation

Following the manufacturers instructions, I cleaned the surface on the doors where the weatherstrip would go with isopropyl alcohol.  Do not underestimate the importance of this step.  The high-tech adhesives used for automotive products work very well, but only if the surfaces to which they are applied are spotlessly clean and free of dust, dirt, water and grease.  Isopropyl alcohol does an excellent job of removing these things quickly.  Don't skip this step or your weatherstrip will fall off the doors in short order.

Isopropyl AlcoholDoor on pad with Isopropyl Alcohol

Using Isopropyl Alcohol to clean residue from door

After cleaning the door surfaces, I removed just a little of the protective liner on the weatherstrip, then I lined up the start of the weatherstrip so that it started under the folded down top edge of the door.  This will help protect it from being caught by passengers entering and exiting the vehicle.

Tuck the end of weatherstrip under door edge - Click to Enlarge

Then I slowly worked my way along the edge of the door, lining up the weatherstrip just inside the edge of the door, then slipping more of the protective liner out as I lightly pressed the weatherstrip in place.

Start out the adhesive,removing the liner strip

Working with the weatherstrip, unrolling with the curve following the same general curve of the door, made it easier to work and probably increases the chance it will stay stuck because the rubber had already started to take shape after being stored in the roll from the factory to the store to me.  I continued applying the weatherstrip until I reached the hinges.

Stop to cut the notches at the hinges

Weatherstrip almost completed

At this point I retrieved a new single edged razor to cut the weatherstrip. 

Single-edged razor for notching and cutting

But instead of either just running over the hinge bar which would have left gaps and caused the weatherstrip to be thicker here, I cut into the weatherstrip just enough to allow the adhesive to lay flat on the hinge bar and conform down to the door surface, but without cutting the weatherstrip surface that provides the seal. 

Special cut to allow weather stripping to adhere to hinge bracket - Click to EnlargeInside of door hinge area and weather stripping - Click to Enlarge

This should give a better seal and allow the weatherstrip to remain stuck to the door.  Here is a shot showing the finished seal.

Weather stripping on inside of door - Click to Enlarge

 

At first, this is going to make the doors harder to close.  But as the weatherstripping conforms to the opening and loses some of its newness, it will allow the door to close more easily and still maintain a seal.

Finished door panel

Manufacturer Instructions for Installation (not all info applies - we did not have any old weatherstrip to deal with)

3M Part Number 08650NA EPDM Rubber Weatherstrip
7/8 thick by 3/4 inch wide x 8 feet long
http://www.3m.com/

Simple application procedure

This supplemental weatherstrip applies quickly and easily next to damaged weatherstrip.

For best adhesion, application surface must be clean and dry. Remove dirt, grease oil etc. from surface with 3M Brand Adhesive and Wax Remover, (3M part #3607 or #08984) or isopropyl alcohol. Dry surface completely. Recommended application temperature range is between 60F (15C) and 100F (38C).

Note: DO NOT REMOVE EXISTING DAMAGED WEATHERSTRIP!

To apply: measure and cut desired length of weatherstrip; remove the orange liner (avoid touching adhesive side with fingers or thumbs), and lightly press in place next to damaged weatherstrip. DO NOT over-stretch weatherstrip.

Immediately check alignment and reposition as necessary. When properly in place, secure by pressing firmly along entire length of the weatherstrip. It's that simple!

Instructions for Weatherstrip installationInstructions for Weatherstrip installationWeatherstrip in package

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

 

Rearview Mirrors

Mirror Detail - Click to Enlarge
Doors MountedMirror DetailMirror DetailMirror Detail

Mirror Detail

MoPar

I have left-over right and left factory mirror mounting plates from the spare mirrors that I use when doorless.

Factory Mirror Mounting Brackets

I mounted them in the proper place on the doors.  The plates mount with flat socket head cap bolts and self-locking nuts.  Instead of relocating the factory mirrors, I bought two small Harley-Davidson Mirrors that will easily collapse for storage.  The installation of the Harley-Davidson mirror mounting the factory brackets is mildly custom since the hardware is not a perfect match.  Here is what I did.

I purchased an assortment of hardware and special fittings from a local Lowe's, and also from Bolt Depot.  The stuff I got at Lowe's is quite common; the stuff I got at Bolt Depot is less common.  I have listed the parts, sources, quantities and sizes below.  All the hardware except for the nylon spacers is 18-8 stainless steel.

Mirror Mounting Assembly Parts - Click to Enlarge
Mirror Mounting Assembly PartsMirror Mounting Assembly PartsMirror Mounting Assembly Parts

In order of assembly working from right to left in the image above:

  • Fender Washer

  • Rubber Washer

  • Spacers (2)

  • Rubber Washer

  • Metal Washer (part number not listed, from home parts bin, but a critical item, fits inside bracket)

  • Tapered spacer (included in Harley-Davidson mirror kit)

  • Nut (acorn nut shown, used lock nut also supplied with mirror kit)

 

  1. The fender and rubber washers are slipped onto the mirror arm, then the arm is inserted into the bracket (the opening of the bracket faces downward).

  2. The two nylon spacers are slipped inside the bracket and onto the mirror arm.

  3. The other rubber washer is inserted inside the bracket and onto the mirror arm.

  4. The metal washer is inserted inside the bracket and onto the mirror arm.

  5. The tapered spacer is inserted inside the bracket and onto the mirror arm, centering itself into the hole on the washer - this centers the bottom of the mirror inside the bracket.

  6. The nut is inserted inside the bracket and threaded onto the bottom of the mirror arm.  It will just thread to the point where the bottom of the mirror arm is flush with the shoulder of the nut.  The top washer outside the mirror bracket will become slightly concave, indicating a good tight fit.

Mirror Assembly - Click to Enlarge
MIrror Assembly

MIrror Assembly Detail - Click to Enlarge
 

The bracket is mounted to the doors at the very top leading edge.  This causes slight interference with the bolts that hold them on and the hinge bracket.  I used a hand grinder to produce some clearance.

Installed Mirror Assembly - Click to Enlarge
Installed Mirror AssemblyInstalled Mirror AssemblyInstalled Mirror Assembly

Installed Mirror Assembly - Click to Enlarge
Installed Mirror Assembly

Harley-Davidson

Harley-Davison Mirror 91875-82TA and 91892-82TA

91875-82TA - Right Side
91892-82TA -
Left Side 

 

Flat Socket Head Bolts for mounting bracket

Part Number: 92210A542
Head Style Flat
Material Type Stainless Steel
Finish Plain
Class Not Rated
Stainless Steel Type 18-8 Stainless Steel
Drive Style Hex Socket
Thread Size 1/4"-20
Length 1"
Hex Key Size 5/32"
Thread Style Right Handed
Thread Length Fully Threaded
Head Diameter .531"
Head Height .161"
Rockwell Hardness B70
Minimum Tensile Strength 70,000 psi
Thread Fit Class 3A
Specifications Met Not Rated

Flat Socket Head Cap Screw Stainless Steel

Flat Socket Head Cap Screw Stainless Steel - Click to Enlarge

Mirror Assembly to bracket and door

Quantity

Part

Size

Number

2

Fender Washers

5/16 x 1-1/4

Hillman H#880345

4

Rubber Washers

5/16 x 1-1/4 x 1/16

Hillman H#880375

6

Socket Flat Head Bolts

-20 x 1

Bolt Depot #4484

4

Nylon Spacers

1 x 3/8 x 3/8

Hillman #880448

6

Lock Nuts Nylon Insert

-20

Hillman #882040

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

 

Edging

The doors are cut from flat stock and while the edges appear to have been burnished to remove sharp edges and burrs, they're still a bit sharp and unfinished looking. $2 worth of 1/4" vinyl tubing and $5 worth of industrial adhesive should give me a nice black edge (cut the tubing neatly to create a channel, then glue it on)  I will write this up when I have finished doing it.

Inside Door Panel Lining

The inside of the doors are simple flat metal plates with the top edge (the window sill, if you will) simply rolled over to form a ledge. Three brackets (sold separately) bolt to the metal door to accept the upper door mounting pins. The pins simply insert to the brackets. This leaves the three brackets and the three pins exposed to the interior and looking like a great place to get raked should I abruptly be forced into the door during a crash or sudden stop (seatbelts and airbags notwithstanding). So I am planning to cut some material (wood or plastic) to countersink these brackets and form a ledge that will double as an arm rest, while putting the brackets safely below a smooth surface that would be less risky to rub against.

Inner Door Panel

One detail that is vexing is the inner surface of the door plate. I checked price for sound deadening material. HiFi material for doors was prohibitively expensive ($100 for a package of self-adhesive rubber tiles with fancy metallic logo-clad exposed surfaces); weather guard roofing (used for the roof-edge near the gutter to protect against frozen water from rotting the roof deck) which was a relative bargain in terms of price ($59) and quantity, but still too expensive and textured like roofing shingles, which was unacceptable. The one thing left that might work is the material used to seal stand-alone constructed showers - a self-adhesive, rubber material in thick sheets - but I got distracted at the home supply store and neglected to price it.  Stay tuned...

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

 

Check Strap

Smittybuilt

Two more things actually - the catch-strap that keeps the door from swinging wide open and hitting the Jeep. I need a couple pieces of webbing and a couple footman loops.  On order...

Door Check Strap

Footman Loop and Door Strap - Click to Enlarge Footman Loop Button Head Allen Bolts - Click to Enlarge
Footman Loop and Finish Nuts Button Head Stainless Steel Allen Bolts
Door Check Strap - Click to Enlarge

1 13029+00 Smittybilt (769401) ADJUSTABLE DOOR CHECK STRAPS (PAIR) 12103.01 $7.99 $7.99

Kentrol Logo

Black Stainless Steel Footman Loop - Click to Enlarge

2 23017+102 KENTROL FOOTMAN LOOP 55-86 CJ SS BLACK 50423 $3.99 $7.98

Inside Handle

I may add some sort of loop handle to use to close the door from inside as there is no handle or grip of any kind.  Presently I use one of the legs of the upper soft door as a handle to latch the door from inside.

Dome Light shut off

Weather stripping on inside of door - Click to Enlarge

The pin that activates the dome light switch is not activated by the doors.  I may add a tab that will shut off the dome light when the doors are closed.  I can use the switch I put in but this would disable the key and light warnings that have proven so useful to me in the past.

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

 

Storage Bins

I wanted some pouches for storing the stuff I keep on my doors.  I found a couple Back Seat Storage bags that looked like they might work as storage on my half-doors. 

Back Seat Organizer (product intended use)Back Seat Organizer (product UPC)Non-Leather

So I purchased them and brought them home.  On the way, I picked up some larger stainless steel washers.

I took off the acorn nuts on two of the bolts that hold the brackets in place.  I made holes in the bags to go onto the bolt, then glued a washer on each side of the hole in the bag to provide strength to the bag where it is bolted to the door.  Then of course, I bolted the bags to the doors.

I put them so they'd remain below the top edge of the door even when the door uppers are removed.

Door Pocket from Outside - Click to Enlarge

Here's what it looks like with the uppers off...

Door Pocket from Inside - Click to Enlarge
Door Pocket from Inside - Click to Enlarge

The passenger side...

Door Pocket from InsideDoor Pocket from InsideDoor Pocket from InsideDoor Pocket from Inside

 

With the uppers installed...

Door Pocket with uppers installed - Click to Enlarge
Door Pocket with uppers installed

Door Pocket with uppers installed - Click to Enlarge
Door Pocket with uppers installedDoor Pocket with uppers installedDoor Pocket with uppers installed
Door Pocket with uppers installedDoor Pocket with uppers installed

 

 

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

Summary

It will take lots of details to work before it is done, but this is an interesting project. What will be funny is when people see them and like them so much they go purchase them and then find out what really comes out of the box!  To finished all the modifications described here, plan on spending another 25-30% of the cost of the doors on the upgrades described here.  And that does not include the soft upper door frames and coverings!  In the end it's not much cheaper than some used 1/2 doors that need to be painted or the Bestop plastic doors that come with speakers.  But these doors can be stashed on board if you don't need them and this was the primary reason for choosing this approach.  If you don't want to remove your doors while you are on the road, those options are probably a better value proposition for you.

Comments

A kit of the upgrade stuff would make an interesting product.  It it does disappoint that the manufacturer would not have thought of it and offered it as an option.

Also I will probably replace all the hardware with Allen head stainless button fasteners to stay consistent with the other fasteners used on things bolted to the Jeep so far.

A nod to style I guess...

Mirrors and Doors Installed - Click to Enlarge
Doors MountedDoors MountedDoors MountedDoors Mounted

 

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

 

 

 

Mirrors and Doors InstalledMirrors and Doors InstalledMirror Rear Side Aspect

Doors MountedDoors Mounted

Front view of Mirror Frontal AspectRear View of Drivers Side MirrorMirror Rear Side AspectMirror Rear Side Aspect

Chrome Won't Get You Home

I've heard it said many times, and it's true.  Words to live by...

Chrome Won't Get You Home!

Chrome Won't Get You Home!
 

Profile for ppro

Doors | Upper Doors | Hardware | Weatherstripping | Mirrors | Check Straps | Storage Bins

 

These are the doors we installed on the 1999 Wrangler (picture may not match the product color)

 

 

 


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